Created by:  University of Alberta

  • Philip John Currie, PhD

    Taught by:  Philip John Currie, PhD, Professor and Canada Research Chair, Dinosaur Paleobiology

    Department of Biological Sciences
LevelBeginner
Commitment12 weeks of study, 1-2 hours/week
Language
English, Subtitles: Italian, German, French
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.9 stars
Average User Rating 4.9See what learners said
Syllabus

FAQs
How It Works
Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from Your Peers
Help from Your Peers

Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates
Certificates

Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

Creators
University of Alberta
UAlberta is considered among the world’s leading public research- and teaching-intensive universities. As one of Canada’s top universities, we’re known for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering and health sciences.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.9 out of 5 of 209 ratings

An insightful and thoroughly well designed course

great course design. Funny and educational. It gives me deeper understanding on Dinosaur,not just a Monster in Mesozoic.

Sincerely this is the best introductory Dinosaur Paleobiology course since Paleoworld of Discovery channel. The retrospective and prospective methodology of the course, the real specimens of fossils of UOA and field work of a paleontologist are the fortress of DINO 101. Thanks so much!

The material in this course was fascinating and well presented. Students needed a certain amount of basic biology and geology to understand the course material, and there were units covering this information. I enjoyed those lectures presented from dig sites and in museums alongside fossils the most, as, for me, the largest attraction is simply seeing what dinosaurs and their predecessors looked like.