About this Course
4.8
11 ratings
2 reviews
100% online

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.
Flexible deadlines

Flexible deadlines

Reset deadlines in accordance to your schedule.
Beginner Level

Beginner Level

Hours to complete

Approx. 24 hours to complete

Suggested: 6 weeks (about 3 to 4 hours of work per week)...
Available languages

English

Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Russian...
100% online

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.
Flexible deadlines

Flexible deadlines

Reset deadlines in accordance to your schedule.
Beginner Level

Beginner Level

Hours to complete

Approx. 24 hours to complete

Suggested: 6 weeks (about 3 to 4 hours of work per week)...
Available languages

English

Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Russian...

Syllabus - What you will learn from this course

Week
1
Hours to complete
3 hours to complete

Understanding drugs and the international drug control framework

Welcome to Module 1! This week's material starts by looking at seemingly simple questions such as : « what are drugs ? » and « why do people use drugs ? » It then addresses the question : « why are drug internationally controlled ? » As you will see the answer to this question constitutes one of the founding blocks of the rest of this course. You will learn what legal elements make up the international drug control framework and what that means for countries putting in place different drug policies around the world. Once you have finished this week, you will be able to: explain what drugs and controlled substances are; describe the main elements of the International Drug Control Framework and recognize the diversity of national drug policies under a unique International Drug Control Framework. We hope that you are prepared to work through the interesting and wide-ranging material we have prepared for you. We also encourage you to stop and answer as many of the in-video (or stand-alone) reflective questions we have placed throughout the week, and look forward to receiving any feedback you may have for us! Have a great first week learning about drugs and the international drug control framework! Best wishes,The Drugs, Drug Use, Drug Policy and Health team...
Reading
10 videos (Total 54 min), 4 readings, 4 quizzes
Video10 videos
Video 1:Introduction to the MOOC4m
Video 2: Introduction to Module 15m
Video 3: The social construction of drugs4m
Video 4: Why do people use drugs?3m
Video 5: Why are drugs internationally controlled?8m
Video 6: What constitutes the international drug control framework?8m
Video 7: Are the international drug control conventions binding on States?7m
Video 8: The increasing questioning of the prohibition regime2m
Video 9: UNGASS 2016: a crack in the international consensus?6m
Reading4 readings
Syllabus and course plan1m
Map of the content of all Modules15m
Essential reading for Module 150m
Optional additional resources for Module 115m
Quiz4 practice exercises
Questions on Video 6 "What constitutes the international drug control framework? "4m
Question on video 7 "Are the international drug control conventions binding on States? "2m
Can you name the unintended consequences of the prohibition regime?2m
Module 1 - Graded Quiz15m
Week
2
Hours to complete
3 hours to complete

Drug Use Worldwide

Welcome to Module 2 ! This week is all about epidemiology and drug use. Indeed, it seems pretty obvious that when looking at drug use around the world, we need to know what we are talking about ; but as you will see, for various reasons, it isn’t always that easy. You will also hear from people who use drugs, telling you about the stigmatisation they often face as well as from scientists who will share their knowledge about how drugs should be classified according to their harms and what the benefits and harms of taking certain drugs are. You will also learn what dependence really means and what health-related issues can sometimes arise with certain drugs and forms of drug use. By the end of the Module you will be able to : • Recall facts, figures and misconceptions about drug use; • Categorize drugs and their relative harms; • Describe problematic drug use and dependence and their negative consequences for individuals and the community. Don’t forget to have a look at the additional optional resources. We hope this week challenges a number of ideas you may have about drug use and their benefits and harms for example; and that you learn a lot about questions related to drugs and health. Best wishes,The Drugs, Drug Use, Drug Policy and Health team...
Reading
9 videos (Total 55 min), 2 readings, 4 quizzes
Video9 videos
Video 2: Epidemiology of drug use4m
Video 3: What is the World Drug Report?3m
Video 4: Perceptions about drugs and drug users around the world8m
Video 5: Stigmatization of women who use drugs4m
Video 6: What does science tell us about the benefits and harms of using drugs?8m
Video 7: Classifying drugs according to their harms5m
Video 8: Does drug use mean dependence?9m
Video 9: Health issues related to drug use7m
Reading2 readings
Essential reading for Module 250m
Optional additional resources for Module 215m
Quiz4 practice exercises
Quiz on perceptions of drugs and people who use drugs2m
Can you classify drugs according to their relative harms?2m
What do you know about health issues related to drug use?2m
Module 2 - Graded Quiz20m
Week
3
Hours to complete
3 hours to complete

Module 3: Addressing drug use and health: prevention, harm reduction and treatment

Welcome to Module 3 which focuses on public health, harm reduction and treatment. In this Module you will see how public health policies address drug use ; become familiar with various harm reduction concepts and tools and learn a bit about the history as well. You will learn a lot about harm reduction itself, seeing how it can fit into existing health policies and look at how policies can include prevention, harm reduction and treatment in a complementary fashion. By the end of the Module you will be able to : • Recall the concepts and list the tools of harm reduction.• Assess treatment options for dependence• and Explain how prevention, harm reduction and treatment complement each other.We hope this week will provide you with a good sense of what harm reduction is and how it fits within wider public health–oriented policies. This week also builds on what you have learnt in Module 2, with regard to certain health issues and looking at when treatment for dependence may be necessary. Don’t forget to go through the essential reading list and look at the optional additional resources. Best wishes,The Drugs, Drug Use, Drug Policy and Health team...
Reading
8 videos (Total 56 min), 3 readings, 3 quizzes
Video8 videos
Video 2: How public health policies address drug use8m
Video 3: Harm reduction: concept and tools5m
Video 4: What is the history of harm reduction?4m
Video 5: Harm reduction is effective6m
Video 6: When is treatment necessary?5m
Video 7: Fitting harm reduction into existing health policies6m
Video 8: Prevention, harm reduction and treatment complement one another16m
Reading3 readings
Essential reading for Module 350m
Optional additional resources for Module 340m
Survey: your language profile and your use of subtitles5m
Quiz3 practice exercises
Can you name key populations related to drug use? and what do you know about the effectiveness of harm reduction measures?4m
Can harm reduction be integrated into health policies?2m
Module 3 - Graded Quiz20m
Week
4
Hours to complete
4 hours to complete

Module 4: Questioning prohibition-based policies

Welcome to Module 4 which looks at questioning prohibition-based policies. In this Module, you will discover that most drug policies in the world are based on prohibition law enforcement and criminalization of drug use ; and see that such policies have a number of negative consequences on people’s health as well as on their human rights. This Module will also look at law enforcement more closely and reveal how it can cooperate to improve health. You will learn about the human rights framework and the drug control framework and see what human rights violations, stemming from the implementation of prohibitionist drug policies, look like around the world. Finally, you will also see that drug policies are connected to development and the environment, most often not in a good way, with prohibition fueling violence, crime and corruption and impeding development. By the end of this Module you will be able to: • Evaluate the extent to which prohibition-based policies have succeeded or failed in reducing drug production, trafficking and consumption; • Describe the negative impacts of prohibition-based policies on health, human rights and development; • Recall how prohibition-based policies fuel organized crime and trafficking. We hope this week will provide you with valuable insight into the reality of prohibitionist drug policies, for people in communities all over the world ; and help you see what have been the consequences of these policies, in terms of their impact on human rights, health and development. We also hope you enjoy the essential reading and optional additional resources we have prepared for you. Best wishes,The Drugs, Drug Use, Drug Policy and Health team...
Reading
15 videos (Total 119 min), 2 readings, 2 quizzes
Video15 videos
Video 2: Most drug policies in the world are based on prohibition law enforcement and criminalization of drug use9m
Video 3: Are prohibition law enforcement drug policies effective?7m
Video 4: The negative impact on health of prohibition law enforcement drug policies5m
Video 5: The impact of law enforcement on public health and public safety6m
Video 6: How law enforcement and health can cooperate to improve health8m
Video 7: How the human rights framework and the drug control framework interact12m
Video 8: Prohibitionist drug policies: violations of human rights9m
Video 9: Prohibitionist drug policies: violations of human rights of women who use drugs14m
Video 10: A closer look at drug policies in Asia – the limits of extremity in drug policy8m
Video 11: Violations of human rights in Central America and South America6m
Video 12: Prohibitionist law enforcement drug policies negatively impact development and the environment6m
Video 13: Prohibition fuels violence, crime and corruption9m
Video 14: How prohibition fuels violence, crime and corruption: the situation in Central America6m
Video 15: How drug law enforcement affects drug markets5m
Reading2 readings
Essential reading for Module 450m
Optional additional resources for Module 4m
Quiz2 practice exercises
Quiz on the relationship between international drug laws and international human rights laws2m
Module 4 - Graded Quiz20m

Instructors

Avatar

Michel Kazatchkine

Senior Fellow
Global Health Center, Graduate Institute for International Affairs and Development, Geneva
Avatar

Barbara Broers

Professor (in Addiction Medicine)
Community Health Departement, Geneva University Hospitals
Avatar

Jennifer Hasselgard-Rowe

Researcher and Lecturer
Institute of Global Health, University of Geneva
Avatar

Aymeric Reyre

Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Medicine, Paris 13 University

About University of Geneva

Founded in 1559, the University of Geneva (UNIGE) is one of Europe's leading universities. Devoted to research, education and dialogue, the UNIGE shares the international calling of its host city, Geneva, a centre of international and multicultural activities with a venerable cosmopolitan tradition....

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Once you enroll for a Certificate, you’ll have access to all videos, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer review assignments can only be submitted and reviewed once your session has begun. If you choose to explore the course without purchasing, you may not be able to access certain assignments.

  • When you purchase a Certificate you get access to all course materials, including graded assignments. Upon completing the course, your electronic Certificate will be added to your Accomplishments page - from there, you can print your Certificate or add it to your LinkedIn profile. If you only want to read and view the course content, you can audit the course for free.

More questions? Visit the Learner Help Center.