About this Course
What makes a successful arts and cultural organization? Led by DeVos Institute Chairman Michael M. Kaiser and President Brett Egan, this course will introduce you to a management theory called the Cycle which supports thriving arts and cultural organizations. Learning from our work with managers from over 80 countries around the world, the DeVos Institute developed the Cycle as a simple, but powerful tool to assist managers in their effort to respond to an increasingly complex environment and propel their institutions to excellence. The Cycle explains how great art and strong marketing can create a family of supporters, who in turn help the organization produce the revenue required to support even more great art the next year. The Institute has seen the Cycle work in performing and presenting organizations, as well as museums, arts schools, and other nonprofit endeavors like service organizations, historical societies, public libraries, university programs, advocacy organizations, botanical gardens, and zoos. By taking this course, you will learn: • the importance of bold, exciting, and mission-driven programming in an organization; • how long-term artistic planning can help an organization produce this work; • how an organization can aggressively market that programming and the institution behind it to develop a family of supporters - including ticket buyers, board members, donors, trustees and volunteers; • how an organization can cultivate and steward this family to build a healthy base of earned and contributed income; and • how an organization can reinvest that income into increasingly ambitious programming year after year. All course material is available upon enrollment for self-paced learners. New scheduled sessions begin each month. For more information about the DeVos Institute's work, visit www.DeVosInstitute.umd.edu.
Globe

100% online course

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.
Beginner Level

Beginner Level

Clock

Approx. 10 hours to complete

Suggested: 6 weeks of study, 1-2 hours/ week
Comment Dots

English

Subtitles: English

Skills you will gain

FundraisingMarketingManagementPlanning
Globe

100% online course

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.
Beginner Level

Beginner Level

Clock

Approx. 10 hours to complete

Suggested: 6 weeks of study, 1-2 hours/ week
Comment Dots

English

Subtitles: English

Syllabus - What you will learn from this course

1

Section
Clock
3 hours to complete

Introduction to the Cycle

Welcome! This first week you will be introduced to the course structure and learn the key principles of the Cycle, a management theory which supports thriving arts and cultural organizations and which serves as the framework for the course. The Cycle proposes that: When bold art is marketed aggressively, an organization attracts a family of energized ticket-buyers and patrons. The income produced by this family is reinvested in more art that, when marketed well, builds a larger, even more diverse family. When this cycle repeats year after year, the organization incrementally and sustainably builds capacity, presence, and health. Following the introductory lectures, you will learn more about the Cycle by reading the executive summary, reviewing answers to frequently asked questions, and completing an introductory quiz. As a reminder, if you are taking this course as a student or enthusiast not affiliated with a specific organization, we recommend you select an organization of your choosing to reference as you make your way through the course!...
Reading
14 videos (Total 75 min), 7 readings, 1 quiz
Video14 videos
Watch: Introduction to the Cycle Part 1 - Two Challenges Facing the Arts4m
Watch: Introduction to the Cycle Part 2 - What makes a healthy organization?4m
Watch: Introduction to the Cycle Part 3 - Example from the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater12m
Watch: Introduction to the Cycle Part 4 - Family and Conclusion4m
Watch: Frequently Asked Questions: The Cycle6m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle with Dance Place (Washington, DC)3m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle: MACLA/Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana (San Jose, California)5m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle at Pregones (New York, New York)10m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle with Mexican Center for Music and Sonic Arts (Morelia, Mexico)2m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle with Anna Lindh Foundation (Alexandria, Egypt)7m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle with the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir (Tallinn, Estonia)2m
Watch: Case Study: Introduction to the Cycle with AS220 (Providence, Rhode Island)4m
Watch: Review of The Cycle and Preparing for Next Week2m
Reading7 readings
Meet Your Instructors5m
Activity: Introductory Questionnaire5m
Recommended Reading: The Cycle: Introduction (Pages 1-5)5m
Review: The Cycle and Annotated Cycle2m
Optional Activity for Students or Learners Not Affiliated with an Organization30m
Read: The Cycle: Executive Summary30m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Introduction to the Cycle10m
Quiz1 practice exercises
Introduction to the Cycle4m

2

Section
Clock
2 hours to complete

Long-Term Artistic Planning

This week, you will learn the benefits of planning your programs further in advance and learn strategies for planning your organizations programs over a five-year time frame. The Cycle proposes that each organization has a rolling, 3-5 year programming plan that is bold, mission-driven, and occasionally surprising. Further, it asks that each organization's programming is the best example of its kind in its environment that forms the basis for aggressive marketing, successful fundraising, and incremental growth in institutional capacity. Following the series of lectures, answers to frequently asked questions, and case studies, you will have the opportunity to apply the principles of long-term artistic planning to your organization using the planning activity provided. ...
Reading
10 videos (Total 79 min), 5 readings, 1 quiz
Video10 videos
Watch: Benefits of Long-Term Artistic Planning12m
Watch: Implementing Long-Term Artistic Planning11m
Watch: Frequently Asked Questions: Long-Term Artistic Planning13m
Watch: Case Study: Long-Term Artistic Planning at Dance Place (Washington, DC)2m
Watch: Case Study: Long-Term Artistic Planning at Penumbra Theatre (Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA)12m
Watch: Case Study: Long-Term Artistic Planning at Cornerstone Theater Company (Los Angeles, California)6m
Watch: Case Study: Long-Term Artistic Planning at Is Sanat Concert Hall (Istanbul, Turkey)5m
Watch: Case Study: Long-Term Artistic Planning at Lush Productions (Karachi, Pakistan)3m
Watch: Review of Long-Term Artistic Planning and Preparing for Next Week2m
Reading5 readings
Recommended Reading: The Cycle: Chapter One (Pages 6-23)18m
Review: Example 5-Year Program Plan2m
Read: 10 Truths about Artistic Planning2m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Long-Term Artistic Planning5m
Activity: 5-Year Program Plan10m
Quiz1 practice exercises
Long-Term Artistic Planning4m

3

Section
Clock
2 hours to complete

Institutional Marketing

This week introduces institutional marketing, one of two marketing perspectives that is used to aggressively compete for audience attention and loyalty. Institutional marketing is the creative use of organizational assets to create spikes in awareness, energy, and enthusiasm around an organization, beginning with the presentation of transformational art itself and continuing through activities that heighten awareness about the people, process, and other institutional assets behind that art. Following the series of lectures, answers to frequently asked questions, and case studies, you will have the opportunity to apply the principles of institutional marketing to your organization using the planning activity provided. ...
Reading
8 videos (Total 34 min), 5 readings, 1 quiz
Video8 videos
Watch: Introduction to Institutional Marketing Part 26m
Watch: Introduction to Institutional Marketing Part 33m
Watch: Introduction to Institutional Marketing Part 41m
Watch: Frequently Asked Questions: Institutional Marketing8m
Watch: Case Study: Institutional Marketing at Dance Place (Washington, DC)2m
Watch: Case Study: Institutional Marketing at Nickelodeon (Columbia, South Carolina, United States)6m
Watch: Review of Institutional Marketing and Preparing for Next Week1m
Reading5 readings
Review: Example Institutional Marketing Calendar1m
Recommended Reading: The Cycle: Chapter Three (pages 47-78)32m
Read: 10 Truths About Institutional Marketing2m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Institutional Marketing10m
Activity: 1-Year Institutional Marketing Calendar10m
Quiz1 practice exercises
Institutional Marketing4m

4

Section
Clock
2 hours to complete

Programmatic Marketing

Programmatic marketing is the second marketing perspective that the Cycle describes. Programmatic marketing can be defined as the tactics used to identify and target potential audiences for each attraction, create awareness and demand, and drive a sale (of tickets, classes, services, or other experiences). Effective programmatic marketing extends beyond the transaction to contextualize each offering, ensure a high-quality experience, and lay the groundwork for a long-term relationship with the buyer. Following the series of lectures, answers to frequently asked questions, and case studies, you will have the opportunity to apply the principles of programmatic marketing to your organization using the planning activity provided. ...
Reading
9 videos (Total 34 min), 4 readings, 1 quiz
Video9 videos
Watch: Programmatic Marketing Part 2: How Are We Selling It?4m
Watch: Programmatic Marketing Part 3: To Whom Are We Selling?5m
Watch: Programmatic Marketing Part 4: At What Price?3m
Watch: Programmatic Marketing Part 5: With Which Media?4m
Watch: Frequently Asked Questions: Programmatic Marketing5m
Watch: Case Study: Programmatic Marketing at Suzanne Dellal Center (Tel Aviv, Israel)3m
Watch: Case Study: Programmatic Marketing at Ciudad Cultural Konex (Buenos Aires, Argentina)2m
Watch: Review of Programmatic Marketing and Preparing for Next Week1m
Reading4 readings
Recommended Reading: The Cycle: Chapter Two (Pages 24-46)23m
Read: 10 Truths for Programmatic Marketing2m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Programmatic Marketing10m
Activity: Marketing Summary for One Program or Event20m
Quiz1 practice exercises
Programmatic Marketing4m

5

Section
Clock
2 hours to complete

Family and Boards

An organization’s family makes up the third aspect of the Cycle. The family is an energized, enthusiastic group of ticket-buyers, board members, donors, trustees, and volunteers that anchors an organization’s financial health through its commitment of time, talent, connections, and financial resources. The heart of the family consists of a joyous, engaged, and excited board of directors. If your organization has a board, you will have the opportunity to apply the principles to your organization's board following the lectures and case studies. ...
Reading
11 videos (Total 60 min), 4 readings, 1 quiz
Video11 videos
Watch: Board Projects3m
Watch: Board Meetings3m
Watch: Board Culture Change3m
Watch: Frequently Asked Questions: The Family and Boards18m
Watch: Case Study: Board Engagement at Dance Place (Washington, DC)3m
Watch: Case Study: Board Engagement at MACLA (San Jose, California)4m
Watch: Case Study: Family at Bronx Documentary Center (New York, NY)6m
Watch: Case Study: Family at British Council (Belgrade, Serbia)3m
Watch: Case Study: Family at AGORA Arts & Culture (Alexandria, Egypt)6m
Watch: Review of Family and Boards and Preparing for Next Week0m
Reading4 readings
Read: Board Audit2m
Recommended Reading: The Cycle: Chapters 4 and 5 (Pages 79-103)25m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Family and Boards10m
Activity: Board Audit10m
Quiz1 practice exercises
The Family and Boards4m

6

Section
Clock
3 hours to complete

Fundraising and Course Summary

Fundraising, the final aspect of the Cycle, consists of a strategy for sustainable growth that joins long-term artistic goals, and energized family, and logical options for investment to build organizational resources donor by donor, week by week, month by month, and year by year. Effective fundraising pairs each family member with a logical, financial action in support of the organization’s mission. Following the series of lectures, answers to frequently asked questions, and case studies, you will have the opportunity to apply the principles of fundraising to your organization by developing, or evaluating, your membership program, major donor program, or targeted campaign. ...
Reading
9 videos (Total 64 min), 14 readings, 1 quiz
Video9 videos
Watch: Three Essential Fundraising Mechanisms4m
Watch: Frequently Asked Questions: Fundraising13m
Watch: Case Study: Fundraising at Dance Place (Washington, DC)10m
Watch: Case Study: Fundraising at British Council (Lagos, Nigeria)8m
Watch: Case Study: Fundraising at Compagnie Pal Frenak (Budapest, Hungary)6m
Watch: Case Study: Fundraising at Center for Asian American Media (San Francisco, California)6m
Watch: Review of Fundraising1m
Watch: Course Conclusion6m
Reading14 readings
Review: The Donor Development Cycle1m
Review: Three Essential Fundraising Mechanisms2m
Review: Example Membership Campaign - Alaska Native Heritage Center10m
Review: Annual Membership Campaign: CBSO10m
Review: Example Targeted Campaign2m
Recommended Reading: The Cycle: Chapter Six (Page 104-137)10m
Read: 10 Rules for Fundraising4m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Fundraising8m
Optional Reading: Integration of Marketing and Fundraising Efforts at Abbey Theatre (Dublin, Ireland)10m
Activity: 1-Year Cultivation Calendar10m
Activity: Annual Membership, Major Donor Campaign, or Targeted Campaign10m
Read: Selected Blog Posts: Course Summary10m
Course Evaluation10m
Optional: Additional Reading1m
Quiz1 practice exercises
Fundraising4m
4.8
Direction Signs

50%

started a new career after completing these courses
Briefcase

83%

got a tangible career benefit from this course

Top Reviews

By RVMay 20th 2018

The Cycle was an eye-opener in many ways. I always thought Arts Management required more artistic intuition than management knowledge, but this framework gave me a whole new perspective.

By YTSep 12th 2017

Really helpful and practical materials. An incredible course, that can save a lot of Arts Organizations! Easy, helpful, deep and useful learning and knowledge!

Instructors

Avatar

Michael M. Kaiser

Founder and Chairman
Avatar

Brett Egan

President

About University of Maryland, College Park

The University of Maryland is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 37,000 students, 9,000 faculty and staff, and 250 academic programs. Its faculty includes three Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 47 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.8 billion operating budget, secures $500 million annually in external research funding and recently completed a $1 billion fundraising campaign. ...

Frequently Asked Questions

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